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filtration

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Wendy in BC, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    I've seen a filtration system that "removes" ammonia and nitrite. Does anyone know anything about this?

    Removes how? Are the byproducts safe?

    Thanks
     
  2. GreenPhoenix

    GreenPhoenix New Member

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    The only ones that I have seen focus on a biological component (biofilm, bioballs, or the like) to convert the nitrogenous compound from ammonia to nitrite to nitrate... I know I have heard of activated charcoal doing some... But I personally haven't heard of any mechanical systems that can really perform the same functions as a bio-component.

    GP
     
  3. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    Thanks GP,

    I suspect it's chemical filtration and not biological. I'll have to dig a bit further.

    This is for additional solid filtration as I'm way over stocked with Tilapia.
     
  4. SolTun

    SolTun Member

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  5. GreenPhoenix

    GreenPhoenix New Member

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    Truthfully if you just need additional solid filtration -- go for the DIY Swirl Biofilter that Badflash designed.... I will dig through all of my stuff when I get home this afternoon and see if I can find the specific links to build one. But I certainly endorse it - I put one into my system at school that is WAY overloaded with trout (30lbs of fish in 150gal tank) and it dropped my ammonia to 0ppm in a week (from 5ppm!)

    GP
     
  6. bigdaddy

    bigdaddy Super Moderator

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    Hi Wendy,

    You may want to read the swirl filters thread.

    Swirl filters are only one many different ways to filter your tanks.Different people have made them up with varying results.Mine worked surprisingly well.

    Cheers.
     
  7. Tsaphah

    Tsaphah Member

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    Put some more gravel growbeds it, they are the best, solids filter, bio-filter, and grow spaceWhistling
     
  8. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    Thanks all for your input.

    SolTun, very interesting reads.

    GP a searched for the thread you mentioned by couldn't find it in DYI or equipment forums. I also searched Badflash, for posts, but the search didn't turn up a member with that name.

    BD I have read the swirl filter posts. It was excellent! I'm trying to avoid engineering something at the moment, but I know I will have to eventually.

    Today I bought a larger solid filter, so that should help. In addition I have a filter container under my vortex bowl, and I change the filter material every few days.

    I also have my floaty filters, that have become so heavy with bacteria that they have sunk just beneath the surface. I should probably add another one, as I think they have made the biggest contribution given their surface area.

    This spring I'll likely pull the GB apart. I think I can double the filtration capacity in it without adding to the weight. I'll add some more charcoal to the bottom for a total of 100mm, then 200 mm hydroton, then 200 mm floaty filters, and another 100 mm hydroton on the top.

    What a mess that will be!
     
  9. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    Yes Andrew I know, but this is an indoor system, so space is very limited. But thanks for your comment.
     
  10. trout

    trout New Member

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  11. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    Yes Lou, I'm sure your right thank you. I remember there was quite a discussion of it not to long ago, I'll go have a look.
     
  12. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    hmmm looks like zeolite is only useful as an emergency measure in AP. Likely it would create more problems than it fixes in the long run. Nevertheless, a good thing to know about and perhaps have on hand..... just in case.
     
  13. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    I've been reading Alan's Book that SolTun linked to:
    quote
    "Requirements for optimal biofiltration


    ? Enough alkalinity to absorb acid from biofiltration, pH range 7.5 to 8.5

    ? Carbon source for biofilm development

    ? Phosphate source for biofilm development

    ? Variety of trace minerals, particularly important for nitrite conversion

    ? High oxygen content at biofilm, preferably high air flow too for low nitrates

    ? Enough surface area to grow sufficient biofilm

    ? Regular disposal of dead biofilm (finite lifetime) and other solids

    ? Do not allow the filter to freeze during winter, earliest possible start in spring, try to keep media active through winter if possible."

    I think I will pay more attention to my pH, as it gets very low, I'll try to keep it in the high 6 range.

    My question however relates "to the regular disposal of bio film". Do we know how long the bacteria live? Should I be regularly removing and rinsing in particular my floaty rainbow filter? I may be adding to my problem here.
     
  14. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    rainbow floaty filter pic
     

    Attached Files:

  15. trout

    trout New Member

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    Hi Wendy

    I'm glad you brought up this thread because its given me an idea for
    my hospital/quarantine tank.

    Why?
    depends whether your an AP purist or pragmatist.
    A purist would never use such a thing.
    A pragmatist would use the most logical solution to his or her problem.
    ie if you have a system that you can't physically add more growbeds
    why not use a zeolite filter.

    As long as you have a regular maintenance routine I can't see problems.
    Even a purist APer will have problems if no maintenance is done.

    A more important question is can you regenerate used zeolite?

    http://guppysaquariumproducts.com.a...actors/dzr-200-zeolite-reactor/prod_2055.html

    cheers Lou
     
  16. RupertofOZ

    RupertofOZ New Member

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    And both a purist & a pragmatist... would have to ask... at what point does the zeolite become saturated... and how do you recognise that point???

    And for $318 (+postage)... you can buy a good Oase bio-filter that can handle 2-3000L of fish tank... converting ammonia into nitrates...

    So again as a pragmatist... why would you bother with a zeolite reactor at that price... and ongoing cost...??
     
  17. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    Lou,

    I may of misunderstood, but what I understand is that zeolite will eventually give up the NH3 ion back to the system. Also it binds other cations (those that have a positive charge) like calcium potassium etc. I suspect they would not be available to the plants in this case. But if they are loosly bond and eventually returned then nothing is lost, but in the case of ammonia, nothing is gained.

    I'm not a purist regarding anything ;), and I'm certainly willing to experiment, as long as it doesn't cause all my fish to die. I really wouldn't want any of them to die, but it's almost impossible to get harvestable fish in Canada. Although I gave Brad some for him, as well as some to foster for me, just in case. :cool:

    In terms of maintenance, I haven't done anything with the floaties (2), and they have a heavy build up. I'm not sure if I should take them out and give them a good rinse now and then. I don't expect an answer as they are not within the purist or even normal approach to filtration in AP. Maybe I'll take one out, give it a good rinse and see what happens to my water chemistry.:D
     
  18. Wendy in BC

    Wendy in BC New Member

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    John,

    I'm trying to determine a way to reduce ammonia or boost the total biological filtration.

    My ammonia stays at .5 - 1 ppm, not so aweful for tilapia
    nitrites are trace
    nitrates are over the top, this is inhibiting the absorbtion of some nutrients by the plants.

    In addition many of these fish are getting quite large, and I'd rather try to circumvent what will eventually become a crisis, by investigating aternative solution now.:)
     
  19. trout

    trout New Member

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    Rupe
    You disappoint me, thought you'd have realized by now I'm a cheap
    bastard.

    I reckon with 90mm pvc pipe, end caps and glue I can make a
    zeolite reactor for less than $20 and still have enough left over
    to buy myself a beer.

    This is a very important question. I don't know the answer yet, but give
    me a month or so and I should have an answer.

    Regeneration of the media may be more problematic, thinking maybe
    boil first then dry in oven.
    Or soak in alcohol, works for me.

    cheers Lou
     
  20. trout

    trout New Member

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    Hi Wendy

    I have Silver perch in my quarantine tank at the moment and
    obviously need to do weekly water changes. If I can reduce this
    to monthly water changes by incorporating a zeolite bioreactor
    I would be very happy.

    In your case I suspect a zeolite reactor would help maintain your system
    when your Tilapia get bigger and before you can eat them. Maybe a period
    of three month a year.

    cheers Lou
     

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